Sealing an Earth Floor – TLS # 55

dirtThis is the second of a two-part article on creating a poured adobe or earth floor. See Earth Floor, TLS#52, for the first article describing how to prepare for and install a poured adobe floor.

By Tom Lander – New Mexico, USA

Now, weeks later after your floor is 100 percent dry, it’s time to seal and fill the floor with Linseed oil. Here in the South West our floors can dry in a matter of a few weeks but in humid climates error on the safe side.

Materials:

Linseed oil. We prefer raw linseed oil, less petroleum additives then the common boiled linseed oil but the boiled works if you are not concerned about petroleum out gassing. Even raw linseed oil has carcinogenic warning labels. Ask for an MSDS sheet. Linseed oil is made from flax seed.

Citrus Solvent (thinner) or mineral spirits, again petroleum out gassing

We are still learning how to estimate coverage and quantity so I’m not sure how much material is needed for your size floor. Maybe buy 2 gallons each for starters; you can buy linseed oil in 5-gallon lots.

Equipment:

4” paintbrushes, natural bristle is always best but pricey

Electric hot plate or gas camp stove

Large pot or kettle

Approved vapor mask

Safety glasses or goggles

Fan for air circulation/expelling fumes if you feel this is necessary

Rags,

Gloves

Prep floor:

Sweep or vacuum any loose debris and dust. You might want to do a light mopping or sponging. Give yourself time for the moisture to dry before applying the oil.

Procedure:

Heat the linseed oil to almost boiling (do not boil). We are just trying to heat the oil to aide in soaking, absorbing in. This must be done outside with caution, flammable. Another option is to pour the oil into a large deep baking pan, cover with a piece of glass and let it sit out in the sun. Leave an air gap. With either method start with a small batch to get the hang of heating and applying.

Transfer the oil into a suitable container. You can paint the material on or if you are quick, you can pour some onto the floor and swoosh it around with the brush. The only risk here is that you will not get an even distribution of material. Try it. Be consistent and watch how the floor is absorbing. If more than one person is applying, then you might get varying results but by the time you are done it shouldn’t matter. Use up your first small amount then decide how much more (a large batch) to heat for your next go at it. For reference keep track of how much material you use for each coat and offer this info to others.

The floor will soak up this first coat and there should not be any pooling of the oil on the surface. Plan your route of attack so you end up working yourself out the door, window or hallway. You should be able to go back to the start and do a second full strength coat right a way. Remember your shoes will be picking up dirt and dust from the outside so take steps to minimize this. There are disposable booties one can buy to cover their shoes.

What we are trying to do is seal the floor but think of it more like filling the floor. Filling all the little air voids between the sand and clay particles with oil.

The floor will dictate the timing and how much material. Watch how the material soaks in. You might be able to continue with more heated, thinned coats the same day, unless you are tired or sick from the fumes and not wearing a vapor mask.

Diluting:

The first two coats can be applied full strength. For the third and fourth coat combine 75% oil with 25% thinner, heat and apply. Watch the absorption, watch for pooling or puddling but also give the material some time to soak in; you just don’t want it to dry on the surface. Have a rag and thinner handy to wipe up any excess otherwise the material dries on the floor and becomes sticky. If this happens then it’s quite a job to use thinner and rags to clean the floor. Apply at least two coats of this first diluted mix.

Next is a 50% to 50% heated mix. Hopefully by now you have learned if pouring and brushing works for you (certainly faster) or just brushing or maybe it’s time now to just brush. Isn’t this fun learning as you go? Like all earthen materials, they tell you when and what to do, what’s the word? Experience.

Remember, oily rags and brushes are flammable so hang out to dry and do not leave a pile of rags unless it’s in the middle of a gravel driveway and you want to have some fun.

www.bioshieldpaint.com

Sunny Side http://www.gillroys.com

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